neuromorphogenesis:

Even Recreational Marijuana May Be Linked To Brain Changes

Adding to earlier evidence that marijuana may be linked to lasting neurological changes, a new study in the Journal of Neuroscience today finds that even casual pot smoking may have an effect on the size and structure of certain brain regions. The new research reports that for each additional joint a person smokes per week, the greater the odds of structural changes to areas involved in motivation, reward, and emotion. Though it seems like the country has embraced pot as a relatively harmless option in recent years, the authors of the study say that their findings suggest otherwise, especially for young people whose brains are still developing.

“This study raises a strong challenge to the idea that casual marijuana use isn’t associated with bad consequences,” said study author Hans Breiter, psychiatry and behavioral sciences professor at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and psychiatrist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. “Some of these people only used marijuana to get high once or twice a week. People think a little recreational use shouldn’t cause a problem, if someone is doing OK with work or school. Our data directly says this is not the case.”

In the new study, the team looked at the brains of people 18-25 years old, some of whom smoked pot recreationally and some who did not. None of the participants showed any signs of being addicted to the drug.

Using different brain imaging techniques, the researchers were able to measure the volume, shape, and grey matter density of two key structures: the nucleus accumbens and the amygdala. The nucleus accumbens is involved in the reward circuit, including pleasure-seeking and motivation, and it’s strongly linked to addiction. The amygdala is involved in emotion, particularly in fear, anxiety, and the stress response, and in drug craving.

The team found that both brain structures varied in multiple ways, according to the number of joints per week the participants smoked – in other words, the more joints smoked, the more brain changes were evident. The nucleus accumbens was especially likely to show alterations in shape and density, and to be larger, as a function of joints per week.

“These are core, fundamental structures of the brain,” said study author Anne Blood, director of the Mood and Motor Control Laboratory at Massachusetts General Hospital and psychiatry professor at Harvard Medical School. “They form the basis for how you assess positive and negative features about things in the environment and make decisions about them.”

What’s interesting about the study is that it suggests that even sometimes-smokers show changes in the brain. What’s not clear is whether there were differences in the pot smokers’ behavior or cognitive function. But the authors suggest that the brain changes seen here may be a sort of precursor to addiction: Earlier studies in animals have shown that the active ingredient in pot, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), may affect neural connectivity, which could be an early sign of a bourgeoning addiction.

“It may be that we’re seeing a type of drug learning in the brain,” said author Jodi Gilman, at Massachusetts General Center for Addiction Medicine. “We think when people are in the process of becoming addicted, their brains form these new connections.”

Although a majority of people in the country support legalization of marijuana, not everyone is so convinced. Last year, Breiter’s team showed that everyday pot smoking in teenagers was, even two years after stopping, linked to brain abnormalities and to poorer working memory. “With the findings of these two papers,” Breiter said, “I’ve developed a severe worry about whether we should be allowing anybody under age 30 to use pot unless they have a terminal illness and need it for pain.”

19

April

176 notes

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pink-vulva:

reasons i want to look GOOD 

  • for myself
  • for myself
  • to plant the seed of envy in other bitch’s hearts
  • for myself

18

April

535,120 notes

This text was reblogged from alreadylost and originally by pink-vulva.

moderndayndnprincess:

A Tribe Called Red won Breakout Artist of the year at the Juno’s.
Why is this a big deal? Because Native performers are usually only nominated for the Native category, and this means that Canada is paying attention to a First Nations group of performers. 
"My people will sleep for one hundred years, but when they awake, it will be the artists who give them their spirit back." Louis Riel
FYI: Juno’s are the Canadian version of the Grammy’s

moderndayndnprincess:

A Tribe Called Red won Breakout Artist of the year at the Juno’s.

Why is this a big deal? Because Native performers are usually only nominated for the Native category, and this means that Canada is paying attention to a First Nations group of performers. 

"My people will sleep for one hundred years, but when they awake, it will be the artists who give them their spirit back." Louis Riel

FYI: Juno’s are the Canadian version of the Grammy’s

18

April

728 notes

This photo was reblogged from reclaimingthenativetag and originally by moderndayndnprincess.

sofapizza:

robofillet:

counterpunches:

literally just a clip of ravers dancing at a music festival, but with the rave music taken out and Benny Hill music put in x

I am never dancing in public ever again

coachella intensifies

17

April

200,939 notes

This video was reblogged from sofapizza and originally by counterpunches.

whatsdifferentincanada:

Big and empty, the way we like it.

whatsdifferentincanada:

Big and empty, the way we like it.

17

April

593 notes

This photo was reblogged from whatsdifferentincanada and originally by whatsdifferentincanada.

#love-hate how little is around me

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Richard Ross

Juveline in Justice

1. A 15-year-old girl on suicide watch, under constant surveillance. In this behavior unit the residents become extremely jumpy and verbal when any event breaks their routine. At the moment all the girls are in their cells. In the entire facility, approximately 75 percent of the population have mental health needs, and of these, 67 percent take psychotropic medication. The construction paper names on the wall celebrate the corrections officers that work the unit. Macon Youth Development Campus, Macon, Georgia.

2. I’m doing my “seg time.” I spend all day and all night in here. No mattress, no sheets, and I get all my meals through this slot. — J., age 16, in a segregation cell in South Bend Juvenile Correctional Facility, South Bend, Indiana.

3. South Bend Juvenile Correctional Facility, South Bend, Indiana.

4. 

5. Giddings State School, in Giddings, Texas houses 320 juveniles and three types of offenders— capital and violent offenses, sexual offenses, and chemical and substance dependency.

6. The “Wall of Shame,” at Miami-Dade Regional Juvenile Detention Center, Miami, Florida: mug shots of kids that were released from the center and killed by gunshot wounds. “Expired” here indicates “deceased.”

7. Probation hearing room at Ventura Youth Correctional Facility, Camarillo, California

8. Control room at Racine Detention Facility, Racine, Wisconsin Twenty-three young men, undersupervised, at Orleans Parish Prison, Louisiana. There was a fight the night before, so staff has taken away privileges of TV, cards, and dominoes. The air conditioner is broken and it is August in New Orleans.

9. I was with a group of guys when I was 13. We jumped this guy near the lake. We got about $400. They gave me the gun ’cause I was the youngest. I been in Juno cottage for two years. I was coming back from the med unit with a homie and we broke into the canteen through a window and ate all the candy bars we could find. He got sick and we only had a five-minute pass so they caught us. I got sent to Valis but got played by a staff there so they sent me here to Martin. —S.T., age 15 Ethan Allen School, Wales, Wisconsin.

10. This is the first time I am here, ever. They are charging me with armed burglary of a residence. —K.T., age 16 Turner Guilford Knight (TGK) Correctional Center in Miami, Florida.

17

April

407 notes

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25 reasons Stephen Harper is bad for Canada →

canadian-communist:

1. Contempt for Canada

The reason you’re being called to vote again, is because on March 25th, 2011, the Harper administration was found to be in contempt of Canadian parliament. This is the first time in the history of any commonwealth government that this has happened. The Speaker of the House of Commons had to rule three times that “the Harper government” appeared to breach parliamentary privilege.
2. Cheated in the 2006 Election
In Spring of 2011, a federal court found that Harper’s Conservatives wilfully violated the $18.3 million election spending limit, during the campaign which originally brought them to power in 2006. 4 Conservatives (including 2 Conservative Senators) currently face charges and possible jail time.
3. Turned Canada’s Surplus into Debt
In 1993, the Conservatives chalked up a $38 Billion deficit. By 2006, under non-conservative leadership, this had been turned around into a $16 Billion surplus. Four years later, and Harper’s Conservatives have returned Canada to a record $56 Billion deficit.
4. Wants US-style bank deregulation
When Harper was president of the National Citizens Coalition, founded in 1967 to oppose universal health care, he supported US-style bank deregulation. Nevertheless, since the 2008 Financial Crisis, he has been taking credit for the relative strength of our financial sector, based on a system he inherited, but didn’t support.
5. Opposes universal health care
Harper believes that universal health care should be provincial, and wants to break it up. While heading the National Citizens Coalition, founded to oppose universal health care, he said “the feds” should scrap the Canada Health Act.
6. Harper shut down Parliament. Twice.
One of the Conservative platform promises was more accountability. Since making this promise, Harper has shut down Parliament twice. Once for several months to block an inquiry into Afghan detainees and to stall government bills, and a second time to avoid a vote of non-confidence which he was expected to lose.
7. Wants to replace the stable CPP with the untested PRPP
Although seniors’ incomes have dropped for the first time in decades, it is clear that the Harper government was laying the groundwork to replace Canada’s well-run, cost-effective, and stable CPP with a private, more expensive pension scheme - the Pooled Registered Pension Plan (PRPP), run by the bank, mutual fund, and insurance industries. This new plan would mean Canadians would have to work for longer, or to retire on less.
8. Shut down Women’s and Minority advocacy groups
Since coming into power, Harper has cut funding for women’s advocacy by 43 per cent, shut down 12 out of 16 Status of Women offices in Canada and eliminated funding of legal voices for women and minority groups, including the National Association of Women and the Law and the Courts Challenges Program.
9. The Economic Action plan has been to the benefit of the super rich
Harper’s economic ‘recovery’ favoured the extremely wealthy. Over 321,000 Canadians lost their jobs in 2008 and Canadians’ average wages fell. Meanwhile Canada’s 100 wealthiest persons became richer, reaching an average net worth of $1.7 billion each, up almost 5 per cent from 2008. The majority of those surveyed by the Parliamentary Budget Office reported that the program has had either a neutral or negative impact on jobs. Even the conservative Fraser Institute has criticized it.
10. Fraud.
One of Harper’s top aides, Bruce Carson, had been convicted of 5 counts of fraud, and is currently under investigation by the RCMP. Most recently he was lobbying the government to buy water filtration systems, from a company where his wife was employed.
11. Loosened regulations to allow more chemical residues on your food
Since taking office, Stephen Harper has weakened regulations so that more pesticide residues can be left on your fruits and vegetables. The plan is to bring Canadian regulations in line with U.S. Levels, which can be up to 100 times higher. Under additional new regulations, corporate food producers will be allowed to conduct their own safety inspections. In 2008, when Luc Pomerleau, a biologist at the Canadian Food Inspection Agency with a flawless 20 year record with the agency, leaked these plans, he was immediately fired. Since then, the listeriosis meat outbreak killed 17 Canadians.
12. Wasteful G20 spending, and a record number of arrests
At the 2010 G20 summit in Toronto, Harper spent $1.9 million building an artifical lake and nearly $1 Billion on security for the 3 day event. 1,105 arrests were made - the largest mass arrest in Canadian history. Of those 1,105 arrests, only 99 criminal charges were laid.
13. Report an unsafe nuclear reactor; get fired.
In 2008, Linda Keen, President of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, reported that the aging Chalk River nuclear facility was at a risk 1000 times greater than the international average. Harper quickly fired her.
14. Stephen Harper has shut down Canadian aid to the world’s most impoverished countries
Despite consistently pointing out that Canada’s economy is a global leader - Harper used the excuse of poor economic times to freeze aid to some of the world’s most impoverished countries. An example of this is the African nation of Malawi, one of the 10 poorest nations in the world. Before Harper, Canada was the 6th largest aid donor to Malawi, and the largest supplier of school books. After coming into power, he closed the Canadian embassy in Malawi and took the country (alongside 6 other African nations) off of Canada’s aid priority list. Harper cut aid to Africa in half, before finally freezing all foreign aid in 2010.
15. The Harper Conservatives want to buy 65 stealth fighter jets using $29 billion of tax payers’ money
That works out to around $1000 per person in Canada. The Conservatives initially reported the cost would be $9 billion, plus $7 billion in maintenance costs. In March, Parliamentary Budget Officer Kevin Page warned Canadians that the Harper Government was low-balling the cost by more than $12 billion.
16. Refusal to sign UN declaration designating clean water as a human right.
In the 2011 budget, the Harper government failed to allocate any new funding for drinking water on First Nations reserves. 100 First Nations communities currently have water advisories, including 49 communities which are high risk. He also refuses to sign the UN declaration designating clean water as a human right.
17. Harper tried to quietly eliminate the Canadian long form census
The long form census is how our government determines the state and needs of the country, and is used extensively in various fields of research. In eliminating the census, many projects would be affected negatively, and it will become much more difficult to understand the needs of the country.
18. Never kept promises of cutting $1.4 Billion in federal subsidies given to oil companies
In 2007, Harper cut $1.2 Billion from the establishment of national childcare, but failed to keep his promise of cutting the $1.4 billion in tax breaks he gives to oil companies, which continue to see record profits.
19. Sabotaging efforts to deal with climate change
Protecting the interests of large oil companies, Harper has fought global efforts to deal with climate change. In 2009, he cut science research funding by $138 Million, and imposed limitations on scientists at Environment Canada, requiring that they obtain permission to do interviews, and often screened their responses. The result is that Canadian media coverage of climate change science has been reduced by 80%. His efforts here have been so destructive, that in 2009 prominent politicians and scientists called for Canada to be removed from the Commonwealth. The last time this mark of shame was used, it was against South Africa while it was still under racist apartheid rule.
20. Cancelled the Kelowna accord
The Kelowna accord was a $5 billion breakthrough agreement to improve the quality of health and education for Canada’s First Nation’s Peoples. Harper cancelled it in 2006, immediately after taking office.
21. Tarnishing our international reputation as Peacekeepers.
'We detained, and handed over for severe torture, a lot of innocent people.' in 2009 Canadian Diplomat Richard Colvin shocked the nation with these words. In Afghanistan, Canada captured 6x more prisoners than the British and 20x as many as the Dutch. Colvin explained that 'Many were just local people: farmers; truck drivers; tailors, peasants…the likelihood is that all the Afghans we handed over were tortured.'
22. Wants more power, less oversight
The Conservatives have vowed to implement unprecedented levels of monitoring on Canadians’ internet activities. Harper has tried and failed (4 times) to create a law that would implement mass scale internet surveillance, and that would allow the government access to private information without any warrants, and without any court oversight.
23. Wasteful prison spending increases, and shutting down rehabilitation centres
Even though crime rates have been falling for a decade, the Harper administration plans to implement tougher laws, and to incarcerate more Canadians than ever before. Plans are to double annual prison spending by 2015 (an increase of $5 billion annually). Meanwhile, six prison farms, considered by some to be Canada’s most effective rehabilitation programs, where inmates produced food for themselves and other prisons - have been closed. This is in spite of having support from the majority of Canadians. Observers say that this will result in inmates being hardened, instead of healed.
24. Breaking traditions
Traditionally, the lobby in parliament has been decorated with photos of former Prime Ministers. Since taking office, Stephen Harper has broken this tradition, decorating the lobby with just photos of himself.
25. Renamed ‘The Government of Canada’ to ‘The Harper Goverment’
In late 2010, public servants from various departments confirmed that Stephen Harper has indeed renamed ‘The Government of Canada’ to ‘The Harper Government’.

- See more at: http://www.whynotharper.ca/#printablelist

17

April

12 notes

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tastefullyoffensive:

Dog Fails (Part 1) [x]

Previously: Goat GIFs

17

April

20,164 notes

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Yellowknife is sitting on enough Arsenic to Kill every Human on Earth →

canadian-communist:

Our northern Canadian territories often get written off by most of us province-dwelling folk as a frigid tundra of nothingness. But it’s probably about time us southerners start paying attention to the situation up north. Yellowknife, is currently sitting on 237,000 tonnes of arsenic, enough to kill the entire human population of our planet a few times over.

The majority of this highly water-soluble carcinogen is sitting in specially designed underground chambers below an old and depleted gold mine called Giant Mine, on the outskirts of the city. The arsenic is a by-product of mining operations that started in the late 1940s, shortly after the discovery of gold in the north. Mining continued until 2004 when the company handed the depleted mine back to the federal government along with loads of arsenic trioxide dust as a nice “fuck-you-very-much.”

For years the local mines’ arsenic production (averaging 22,000 lbs a day) was left unregulated until 1951, when a child from the Yellowknives Dene First Nation died of poisoning from eating snow in the area. It became apparent that the government needed to do something about it. But instead of shutting down operations, they thought the best course of action was to collect the massive amounts of poisonous dust in purpose built chambers underground, presumably hoping that the arsenic trioxide fairy would eventually come and take all of it away. They handed the child’s family $750 and decided to wait it out.

However, with a crumbling infrastructure and increasing concern about leakage into the local water supply, the time has come to do something about it. Now that it is 2014 and our Canadian government is older and wiser, they have finally come up with what a reasonable solution to our minor poison problem: we are going to freeze the 237,000 tonnes of arsenic trioxide underground for all of eternity.

“How can we ever ensure that human systems are going to continue to keep something that requires rather sophisticated engineering and monitoring to function forever, that’s just crazy,” argues Kevin O’Reilly, an activist with Northern Alternatives. “We can’t even remember how the pyramids were built 5,000 years ago, how can we know that 5,000 years from now, if there are even people on this planet, that they are going to know what to do to keep this stuff frozen. That’s just irresponsible.”

The government had originally hoped that permafrost would creep its way back into the area and freeze the arsenic naturally, despite warnings from engineers that came as early as the 1950s that this would not be the case. After a decade of fruitless waiting the government’s plan to achieve this “frozen block” solution is to mimic the way an ice rink is kept frozen. That is: by continuously pumping coolant into the ground, the arsenic should theoretically stay frozen.

The freezing as of now is expected to cost at least one billion initially, and then an additional two million every subsequent year.

“My own thoughts are that we probably should bring the stuff up above ground and process it into a less toxic form of arsenic and put it at the bottom of the mine,” says Kevin. But this solution is seen as too costly to implement.

The government’s remediation plan of icing out the arsenic was initially met with uniform opposition from every group involved with Giant Mine. The Mackenzie Valley Review Board, an independent tribunal which aims to give the surrounding aboriginal peoples a greater say in the management of the area, proposed an environmental assessment, which will hopefully be approved by the minister in Ottawa any day now. The assessment lays out numerous amendments that include “forever” being reduced to only 100 years, as well as putting funding towards research that would seek to find a more attainable solution for the mine.

“The project went from having uniform opposition from every group involved to having support from many groups after environmental assessment,” says Alan Ehrlich, a member of the Mackenzie Valley Review Board.

The City of Yellowknife as well as the Yellowknives Dene First Nation unanimously passed a motion to accept the Review Board’s proposed amendments, as they would bring the people a slightly more hopeful future for their area. This is especially important when you put into context how much Giant Mine has affected the Dene people’s lands, upon which the mine is located.

The carelessness with which the mine was operated in the first few years of production has had profound repercussions on the Dene people. With no pollution control, everything inside the mine was going up the stack. Even towards the end of the mine’s life in 2004, there was still around 26 kilograms of arsenic being diffused into the air every day. The end result was complete contamination of the Dene’s land.

“They have often talked about their land being destroyed,” says Kevin. “They used to go into the Baker Creek area as it was well known for fishing and berries. It’s really hard to find any blueberries around Yellowknife anymore. They’ve been scorched off the surface of the earth by the sulphur dioxide emissions from the mine.”

“They used to harvest throughout the area where the mine was,” Alan continues. “It was also on routes for hunting caribou as well, and now it has become one of the most contaminated sites in Canada.”

It’s no surprise that they would be concerned about how the proposed cleanup will affect them further. Numerous contaminated buildings will have to be exhumed and destroyed in an attempt to decontaminate the area, and soil will have to be removed which has the potential to create toxic dust. The Dene people have raised concerns of how this will affect them physically and culturally, as many of their key cultural practices are closely tied to the land.

“One thing that I think is outstanding is the need for a public apology and compensation to the Yellowknives Dene First Nation for what was done to them and their land,” says Kevin. “There needs to be some acknowledgement that something bad happened and that [the government] will do their best to make sure that it never happens again.”

17

April

10 notes

This link was reblogged from canadian-communist and originally by canadian-communist.

neurosciencestuff:

Study Examines Vitamin D Deficiency and Cognition Relationship
Vitamin D deficiency and cognitive impairment are common in older adults, but there isn’t a lot of conclusive research into whether there’s a relationship between the two.
A new study from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center published online ahead of print this month in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society enhances the existing literature on the subject.
“This study provides increasing evidence that suggests there is an association between low vitamin D levels and cognitive decline over time,” said lead author Valerie Wilson, M.D., assistant professor of geriatrics at Wake Forest Baptist. “Although this study cannot establish a direct cause and effect relationship, it would have a huge public health implication if vitamin D supplementation could be shown to improve cognitive performance over time because deficiency is so common in the population.”
Wilson and colleagues were interested in the association between vitamin D levels and cognitive function over time in older adults. They used data from the Health, Aging and Body composition (Health ABC) study to look at the relationship. The researchers looked at 2,777 well-functioning adults aged 70 to 79 whose cognitive function was measured at the study’s onset and again four years later. Vitamin D levels were measured at the 12-month follow-up visit.
The Health ABC study cohort consists of 3,075 Medicare-eligible, white and black, well-functioning, community-dwelling older adults who were recruited between April 1997 and June 1998 from Pittsburgh, Pa., and Memphis, Tenn.
“With just the baseline observational data, you can’t conclude that low vitamin D causes cognitive decline. When we looked four years down the road, low vitamin D was associated with worse cognitive performance on one of the two cognitive tests used,” Wilson said. “It is interesting that there is this association and ultimately the next question is whether or not supplementing vitamin D would improve cognitive function over time.”
Wilson said randomized, controlled trials are needed to determine whether vitamin D supplementation can prevent cognitive decline and definitively establish a causal relationship.
“Doctors need this information to make well-supported recommendations to their patients,” Wilson said. “Further research is also needed to evaluate whether specific cognitive domains, such as memory versus concentration, are especially sensitive to low vitamin D levels.”

neurosciencestuff:

Study Examines Vitamin D Deficiency and Cognition Relationship

Vitamin D deficiency and cognitive impairment are common in older adults, but there isn’t a lot of conclusive research into whether there’s a relationship between the two.

A new study from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center published online ahead of print this month in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society enhances the existing literature on the subject.

“This study provides increasing evidence that suggests there is an association between low vitamin D levels and cognitive decline over time,” said lead author Valerie Wilson, M.D., assistant professor of geriatrics at Wake Forest Baptist. “Although this study cannot establish a direct cause and effect relationship, it would have a huge public health implication if vitamin D supplementation could be shown to improve cognitive performance over time because deficiency is so common in the population.”

Wilson and colleagues were interested in the association between vitamin D levels and cognitive function over time in older adults. They used data from the Health, Aging and Body composition (Health ABC) study to look at the relationship. The researchers looked at 2,777 well-functioning adults aged 70 to 79 whose cognitive function was measured at the study’s onset and again four years later. Vitamin D levels were measured at the 12-month follow-up visit.

The Health ABC study cohort consists of 3,075 Medicare-eligible, white and black, well-functioning, community-dwelling older adults who were recruited between April 1997 and June 1998 from Pittsburgh, Pa., and Memphis, Tenn.

“With just the baseline observational data, you can’t conclude that low vitamin D causes cognitive decline. When we looked four years down the road, low vitamin D was associated with worse cognitive performance on one of the two cognitive tests used,” Wilson said. “It is interesting that there is this association and ultimately the next question is whether or not supplementing vitamin D would improve cognitive function over time.”

Wilson said randomized, controlled trials are needed to determine whether vitamin D supplementation can prevent cognitive decline and definitively establish a causal relationship.

“Doctors need this information to make well-supported recommendations to their patients,” Wilson said. “Further research is also needed to evaluate whether specific cognitive domains, such as memory versus concentration, are especially sensitive to low vitamin D levels.”

17

April

158 notes

This photo was reblogged from neurosciencestuff and originally by neurosciencestuff.

explore-blog:

Absolutely fantastic and culturally necessary read on our hidden biases, to which even the best-intentioned of us are susceptible.

explore-blog:

Absolutely fantastic and culturally necessary read on our hidden biases, to which even the best-intentioned of us are susceptible.

17

April

915 notes

This photo was reblogged from sagansense and originally by explore-blog.

 

 

17

April

377 notes

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neuromorphogenesis:

Language and Your Brain

For centuries, researchers have studied the brain to find exactly where mechanisms for producing and interpreting language reside. Theories abound on how humans acquire new languages and how our developing brains learn to process languages.

By Voxy.

17

April

1,862 notes

This photo was reblogged from neuromorphogenesis and originally by neuromorphogenesis.

A Statistical Analysis of the Work of Bob Ross →

17

April

6 notes

This link was reblogged from cognitivedefusion and originally by cognitivedefusion.

#probability #statistics #bob ross

mothernaturenetwork:

Tapping the health benefits of pure maple syrup

mothernaturenetwork:

Tapping the health benefits of pure maple syrup

17

April

220 notes

This photo was reblogged from mothernaturenetwork and originally by mothernaturenetwork.